Tsai’s Facebook page spammed by alleged Chinese netizens

TAIPEI (The China Post/ANN) - Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen welcomed Chinese netizens to Facebook after users, apparently from mainland China, flooded her wall with vitriolic posts on Wednesday.

Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen welcomed Chinese netizens to Facebook after users, apparently from mainland China, flooded her wall with vitriolic posts on Wednesday.

Tsai noted that she viewed the sudden influx of posts in a positive way. She hoped the alleged Chinese netizens would be able to experience different perspectives in Taiwan via Facebook, and welcomed them to visit her fan page on Facebook as well.

The comments, in simplified Chinese, were mostly insults aimed at the DPP and the Taiwan independence movement. By mid-day, one of Tsai’s posts, the main target of the netizens’ ire, had accumulated over 75,000 comments.

Although restricted by the so-called Great Firewall, access to Facebook is still possible within China. The Ministry of the Interior said that an investigation into the origin of the posts is under way.

Earlier, in a meeting yesterday with US congressman Matt Salmon on the topic of Taiwan’s bid to join the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), Tsai expressed hope of seeing US support the Taiwanese people’s freedom of choice.

The key link that ties Taiwan and US together is in its shared values of upholding freedom and democracy, Tsai said in a DPP statement released after the meeting.

In response, Salmon named Taiwan an important ally of the US in the Asia-Pacific region, and noted the continued bipartisan support for Taiwan within the US Congress. Salmon currently serves on the House Committee on Foreign Affairs and chairs its Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific.

According to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Representative Salmon is scheduled to stay in Taiwan until November 13, and has already met with President Ma Ying-jeou and Kuomintang chairman and presidential candidate Eric Chu.

Salmon first arrived in Taiwan in the 1970s and lived here for around two years as a Mormon missionary.

In other news, DPP heavyweights were notably absent from its candidacy list for legislator-at-large seats, presented after the central executive committee meeting. The list of nominations included social activists and incumbent lawmakers.

Heavyweights, including former premier Frank Hsieh, former DPP chairman and Premier Yu Shyi-kun, and former DPP chairman Su Tseng-chang did not make the cut.

Hsieh reiterated his respect for Tsai’s decisions, and denied contacting Tsai or DPP campaign committee members before the list was settled.

He also called for party unity in the face of the upcoming elections, and emphasised the importance of not encouraging a “DPP-version” of an intra-party conflict, a nod at the previous in-fighting within the Kuomintang.

Secretary-General Joseph Wu, quoting Tsai’s remarks made during the central executive committee meeting, stated that the list reflects the issues that voters are most concerned with, including food safety, environmental protection, social welfare, healthcare, long-term care, finance, gender and education.

Wu also stressed how Tsai felt sympathetic toward Hsieh and other DPP heavyweights, stating their selflessness during this round of nominations, despite recent media reports that proved “to be unfair towards them -- they were understanding towards mine [Tsai's] and the campaign committee’s decision.”

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